« Opensource / Free software, Volunteerism and Support | Main | Design Patterns in Modern Perl »

05/21/2010

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Illusori

I think you're missing the point and creating a false duality.

The gift view isn't about software being unsupported, it's about any
support being offered being a gift as opposed to an entitlement.

Other software authors are entirely allowed to put whatever constraints they want on themselves, but when they start saying how other people should be constrained, and start claiming that by releasing open source you ought to do X, Y and Z, well sorry that's stepping over the line.When I release open source free software you're entitled to accept exactly what I'm offering, nothing else. There's no unspoken contract, there's no implication of anything other than what's on the table.My "belief structure" in this, in no way impinges on any other author's choice in how they release software, it has no "authority or power to devalue others".I do find it offensive however when someone else tells me that my no-strings-attached free gift in some way obliges me to do anything at all. It simply isn't their call to make.

phaylon

I agree with Illusori. It boils down to the question "Is it immoral to release code as free software with none or incomplete documentation?"

John Napiorkowski

In our case (the CPAN case) I don't think its immoral to release something and not follow through on support. As I said CPAN is large enough to swallow crap and the community is strong enough to overcome it. On the other hand, just to notice, but the stuff we all use the most tends to me reasonable documented and well supported. So I guess we have the idea of "Its not expected, but without it the changes of your code being very valuable is low." Or so it seems.Thanks for the feedback :)

vancouver internet marketing


!--
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
{mso-style-parent:"";
margin:0in;
margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:12.0pt;
font-family:"Times New Roman";
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
{color:blue;
text-decoration:underline;
text-underline:single;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
{color:purple;
text-decoration:underline;
text-underline:single;}
p
{mso-margin-top-alt:auto;
margin-right:0in;
mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
margin-left:0in;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:12.0pt;
font-family:"Times New Roman";
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";}
@page Section1
{size:8.5in 11.0in;
margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;
mso-header-margin:.5in;
mso-footer-margin:.5in;
mso-paper-source:0;}
div.Section1
{page:Section1;}
--


The open source model includes the concept of
concurrent yet different agendas and differing approaches in production, in
contrast with more centralized models of development such as those typically used
in commercial software companies
vancouver marketing agency


The comments to this entry are closed.